Industry News

Embraer partners with Porsche

Imagine pairing your Phenom with a Porsche.

It can be some effort pairing your meal with the perfect wine.

But imagine pairing your private jet with a car.

Embraer partners with Porsche

Embraer recently turned heads partnering up with Porsche in providing an extremely limited edition duet of their world-leading Phenom 300E private jet with Porsche’s 911 Turbo S.

There are only 10 of these ‘sets’ available at a price starting fro $11m USD taking over 12 months from order to delivery.

It’s all about a “seamless transition” of road to sky, says Boris Apenbrink, the director of Porsche’s internal Exclusive Manufaktur department, during a video call to Executive Traveller about the collaboration.

“The jet is meant to be piloted by the owner himself, and we also wanted the car that was the most fun to drive itself.”

“This is about making dreams come true for our customers,” he continues. And yes, it’s a bit of stunt marketing in the process.

Neither party’s are saying whether this will be the first and final collaboration, so we wonder if the best is yet to come?

Luxury Escapes partners with Airly

Airly joins forces with Luxury Escapes

Read the full Business Insider article here.

Aussie private jet business Airly has teamed up with travel company Luxury Escapes to offer travellers another way to fly.

Through the partnership, Luxury Escapes has new private return charter experiences for up to four people, with destinations including the Whitsundays and the Gold Coast.

Luxury Escapes partners with Airly

Luxury Escapes head of strategic partnerships Darran Kiel told Business Insider Australia via email the partnership came about because of the connection between what both companies offer – luxury private jets and luxury accommodation.

“At Luxury Escapes we have always really loved the Airly business model and have been in conversations with them for a while on how we could provide that next level of experience for our customers,” he said.

“The main objective for us was to find a way to start the holiday experience early for our customers. With the Airly partnership, the holiday starts as soon as they leave their home. We are thrilled to have been able to work with their team and incorporate this experience into our holiday packages.”

Airly Co Founder Luke Hampshire

‘Essential travel hasn’t stopped’: Australian private jet startup Airly has seen an 80% rise in usage during the coronavirus pandemic

View the full article here.

While the travel industry has taken a massive hit from the coronavirus pandemic, the number of people using Aussie private jet startup Airly has risen.

Airly, which launched in 2016, is an app-based service where members can book flights on a private jet – either by opting-in to an existing flight, or initiating a new one.

Co-founder Luke Hampshire told Business Insider Australia the service had been busy during the fourth quarter of 2019 until the bushfires hit and travel started declining. Then the coronavirus pandemic struck, initially causing a decline in usage.

But, in recent months, that has changed. Hampshire said usage on the app is up 80%, with the company doubling its membership numbers over the last three months.

The pandemic threw a very large spanner in the works for airlines both internationally and in Australia. In March, Qantas suspended all international flights, around 60% of domestic flights and stood down around 20,000 workers. Meanwhile, in April, Virgin Australia collapsed into voluntary administration.

Hampshire said flights over the past two weeks have been above average with June “looking very busy”.

Airly Co Founder Luke Hampshire

“We’re in one of the best positions globally from the COVID perspective,” Hampshire said. “We’re very nimble. We’re able to move quickly, we see the demand, we see the interest [and] we can apply that model to what’s required. Whereas the airlines are slow-moving. They have a lot of assets, they have a lot of moving parts that take time to scale up.”

How Airly works

Hampshire describes Airly as a service that merges the perks of private travel with the predictability of commercial flights. “The big goal has always been how can we make private [flights] accessible and affordable to more sophisticated travellers,” he said.

Airly doesn’t require users to pay ongoing membership fees.

“We don’t want people paying for not using us,” Hampshire said. “So basically we can get members in now with no ongoing fees, let them check the app out, let them initiate a flight risk-free, get them on board and get them flying.” It was a decision the company made once the coronavirus pandemic set in, as a new way to provide value for its members.

Once you download the app and apply for membership, you get to either opt in for an existing flight or initiate a flight.

“What happens is that it sends out a notification to all the other members that the flight’s been initiated,” Hampshire explained. “The big difference for us is that you’re not paying for the whole jet, you’re just paying for what you need. And then we rely on other members to get on board, get involved and to book as well.”

Cost-wise, a flight from Melbourne to Sydney or Sydney to the Gold Coast flight costs $1295 a seat each way.

Most of Airly’s customers are business owners

Airly isn’t a scheduled operation. The company had considered it as a business model in the past but never went ahead with it.

“What we feel is the best option is to let our members decide when they need to go,” he said. “Ironically, they tend to be at similar times, which is helpful. It means you can get more than one group of members on a round trip.”

“Members who didn’t know each other prior to the flight actually become strong connections by the end of the flight,” Hampshire added.

Most of Airly’s current customer base are business owners. “Essential travel hasn’t stopped,” Hampshire said.

He explained that there was a period of time during the start of the pandemic when everyone was isolating – something Airly was advocating for as well. No one was flying through March and part of April before travellers started returning, especially business owners who have to travel to each of their business locations.

“It’s quite a contrast to everyone expecting work from home and Zoom to take over,” Hampshire said. “We’re still seeing those business owners needing to get from A to B.”

As a charter flight company, Airly is capable of doing global flights, including repatriation trips all the way from Europe. However, the company’s core focus is its shared flights – mainly from Sydney to Melbourne.

While Airly can provide charter flights for one-off destinations, its shared flights aim to capture the most popular routes. They do seasonal flights to destinations like Byron Bay and the Sunshine Coast, as well as options later in June for the snow season.

The company considers itself a supplementary service rather than a competitor to commercial airlines

Airly has coronavirus preventative measures in place

Airly uses the Embraer range of aircraft – a four-seat option called a Phenom 100 and the eight-seater Phenom 300. Hampshire said having these planes provides consistency for passengers because “we don’t want to be throwing 10 different aircraft at members.”

Embraer Phenom 300
The eight seat Phenom 300

“They’re the perfect jet for us,” Hampshire said. “They’re capable of carrying a lot of luggage, they’re extremely economical, they’re the most carbon efficient jet available in Australia and it’s just a very comfortable ride for your one to two to three-hour flights.”

Hampshire also went through the measures Airly is taking to prevent coronavirus on flights.

Each passenger is required to provide a 14-day travel history before the flight. On the day of the flight, there are temperature checks at the door, and passengers are encouraged to use hand sanitiser. On shared flights, you’ll be required to use face masks, especially when there’s more than one group of members boarding.

While Airly had under 100 members for “a long period of time” through 2019, it now has more than 180 members. It wants to become the first point of call for people looking for a flight.

“The big goal now is to aggressively expand with our investors and keep increasing flights and as borders open we get Australia moving,” Hampshire said. “Right now it’s business travellers [and] we can’t wait until we can start moving leisure travellers around again.”

Embraer Praetor 600 Private Jet cabin

Disruptive by choice: The Embraer Praetor 600 private jet

The media has been filled with negative outlooks on the global markets, blaming the COVID-19, housing bubbles and the ‘correction that was required’.

But amongst the standard doomsday articles stood a positive outlook for private jet deliveries. Up 15% in 2019 partly with thanks to the new Praetor range.

Disrupting the business jet landscape

Embraer’s Phenom 300 family continues to win the coveted most delivered private jet (light) title. But Embraer have always left a gap in the market when it comes to range.

The new Praetor family swooped into the market providing new-found range capabilities while maintaining the high-end and practical cabin layout, advanced systems and operating efficiency.

The Praetor 600 has a range of 4,018 nautical miles, very similar to the older Bombardier Challenger aircraft, but more than the Challenger 300. New York to London and Sydney to Singapore are now valid options for new owners.

Embraer Praetor 600 private jet

Beauty found within

If you have followed us for some time, you’d know that we’re big fans of Embraer’s Phenom 300E. Especially the smart and practical cabin.

The Praetor’s cabin is stunning, beautifully appointed and comes in various configurations.

Additional perks include the lower cabin altitude leaving travellers fresh after the flight.

Embraer Praetor 600 private jet cabin
Challenger 350 private jet

Montreal becomes the first facility outside the USA to take delivery of sustainable aviation fuel (SAF)

Bombardier is making solid progress on its commitment to reduce the carbon footprint of private aviation by announcing their first shipment of Sustainable Aviation Fuel outside of the US.

Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) is created from renewable sources, but mimic the chemistry of petroleum jet fuel and can be used in today’s aircraft and engines without modification and provide the same level of performance and safety as today’s petroleum-derived jet fuel.

Montreal has become the first facility outside of the US to take shipment of SAF.

The arrival of 27,600 litres (7,300USgal) of cooking oil-based biofuel at the Dorval manufacturing plant also represents another step in the airframer’s ambition to secure a long-term supply of SAF across its global facilities, as sustainable fuel becomes more readily available.

This shipment will fuel the Challenger 350 (pictured) and 650 jets, but plan to boost supply in 2020 to include the new Global range.

Bombardier Challenger 350

Original article via Flight Global.

Gulfstream G500

After the G450 private jet success, what’s next for Gulfstream?

The 19th of January marked the final delivery of the Gulfstream G450 private jet. Since 2005, the G450 (formally known as the GIV-SP) was part of a thirty year legacy of the GIV family. Over 900 GIV-era airframes were delivered over the past thirty years. But what now for Gulfstream?

Making way for the private jet of tomorrow

The announcement of the G500 private jet resulted in the decay of G450 sales leading to the cessation of manufacturing. Costing around $45m USD, the G500’s popularity continues to grow with operators such as Qatar Executive and Flexjet making orders.  The interior of the G500 is immaculate with a maximum capacity of 19 passengers, state of the art high-speed internet capability and the finest level of detail you can find in the market.

Gulfstream G500 interior.
Interior of the Gulfstream G500.

Gulfstream also continue to push innovative boundaries via the larger G600 and G650/650ER private jet.

Order uptick

Signals showed a growth in sales momentum following far from prosperous delivery figures in 2016. “The G650 boasts a 24-month backlog at current production rates. The G550 has a roughly 12-month backlog” says Jason Aitken, senior vice-president and chief financial officer at General Dynamics.

Bombardier Global 7500

Competition heats up for ‘world’s private jet’ crown

Bombardier have come out swinging as they gear up to deliver their newest private jet, the Global 7000, to customers by the end of 2018. Despite the whopping price tag of $93m, reports state that the waiting list is now four years long.

Bombardier Global 7500.

In what appears to be a clash of the titans, Gulfstream have comfortably held the ‘world’s private jet‘ crown for some time with the delivery of the G650 but it is the capability and offering of the Global 7000 that could make things interesting.

Boasting the longest range in the market of 13,700km the Global 700 would comfortably fly direct from San Fran to Sydney. It’s also nimble enough to land at London City Airport. And the cabin is in a class of its own. With a maximum capacity of 19 passengers you’re guaranteed the greatest of luxury on board with the world’s fastest in-flight internet, four living sections, a master bedroom featuring a large double bed and ensuite bathroom.

The long haul private aviation market is always interesting to watch and much like the hype generated for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner expect to see quite the competition between the two major private jet manufacturers.